benefits of goldenseal root for utis

Benefits of Goldenseal Root for UTIs - Urinary Tract Infections

Goldenseal has earned its position among the top five best-selling herbal products in the United States, primarily due to its numerous benefits, particularly its potential to address UTIs. With constituents like alkaloids, Berberine, and antibacterial properties, Goldenseal root shows promise in managing UTIs (Urinary Tract Infections). This article will explore the specific advantages of Goldenseal root for UTIs and examine the scientific perspective.

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What Is UTIs?

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that involves any part of the urinary tract. It can be in any organ in the urinary system, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Most infections involve the lower urinary system the bladder and urethra. It is one of the most common infections in primary care.

According to 2016 research results, adult men under 50 years old have a low incidence of UTI, while adult women have a risk 30 times higher than men. [1]

Women who have had sex are most susceptible to urinary tract infections. Adult cases of this disease occur in the elderly and in patients requiring urinary catheters.

Goldenseal Root For UTIs: Does Goldenseal Root Really Work?

mechanism of goldenseal root for utis

Goldenseal has biologically active alkaloids, and the isoquinoline alkaloids produced by this herb's rhizomes, rootlets, and root hairs are believed to contribute to its medicinal properties.

These bioactive compounds may act similarly to the proanthocyanidins found in cranberries, inhibiting bacterial adhesion to the bladder wall.

Furthermore, Goldenseal contains Berberine, a bioactive herbal alkaloid found in many medicinal plants such as H. Canadensis, Berberis aquifolium, B. vulgaris and B. aristata, which has been used in the treatment of UTIs.

Notably, Berberine exhibits antibacterial activity against UTIs by disrupting the adhesion of E. coli to the bladder epithelium. [2]

What Are Benefits Of Goldenseal Root For UTIs?

goldenseal root benefits for utis

Goldenseal is renowned for its potential in treating various infections, boasting a composition rich in isoquinoline alkaloids such as hydrastine, Berberine, berberastine, hydrastinine, tetrahydroberberastine, canadine, and canalidine. [3]

Comparative chemical studies of Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) root powder from three commercial suppliers have shown that current Goldenseal foods contain these substances. [4]

Berberine notably prevents urinary tract infections (UTIs) by inhibiting bacterial adherence to the bladder wall [5]. As a result, botanical sources such as Goldenseal, which contain Berberine, show potential in UTI treatment.

In a separate study, the chemical components of certain potent urinary herbs were analyzed. Berberine constitutes approximately 5-6% of the total alkaloid content found in the roots and rhizomes within the goldenseal plant.

Notably, this substance has demonstrated a wide-ranging spectrum of antibiotic activity against pathogenic organisms, including but not limited to Chlamydia, E. coli, Salmonella typhi, and Entamoeba histolytica. [6]

Hence, Goldenseal can potentially serve as a potent remedy for UTIs.

Goldenseal Root Dosage For UTIs

Goldenseal supplements are available in various forms, including capsules, lotions, drops, sprays, eyewashes, and feminine hygiene products.

Utilizing powder supplements from reputable brands processed from the dry root of Goldenseal offers numerous benefits, not only in terms of product quality but also in terms of convenience during usage.

  • Dry root supplements are typically taken in doses ranging from 0.5–10 grams, taken thrice daily. [7]
  • Tinctures are usually taken in 2–4 mL doses three times a day. [7]
  • The liquid extract is usually taken in doses of 0.3-10mL thrice daily. [7]

Other Health Benefits Of Goldenseal Root

there are many herbs that beneficial for UTIs

Immune System Support: Goldenseal's medicinal plant can enhance immune function by increasing the production of antigen-specific immunoglobulins. Research has proven that the body can continuously produce immune globulin when using Goldenseal. [8]

Antioxidant Properties: Goldenseal also possesses antioxidant activity, which can help reduce oxidative stress in the body and prevent cell damage caused by free radicals.

Berberine has demonstrated noteworthy anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and exhibited neuroprotective and cardiovascular effects.

Additionally, it has shown potential effectiveness in lowering lipid levels and improving insulin resistance. [9]

Anti-inflammatory effect: Research has demonstrated the anti-inflammatory properties of Goldenseal, safeguarding against various skin conditions such as rashes, allergies, itching, and dermatitis. [9]

Diabetes: A considerable potent effect of Goldenseal is in the treatment of diabetes. Thanks to the abundant Berberine in its ingredients, Goldenseal may help improve and may prevent diabetes extremely effectively. [9]

Cure The Common Cold: Goldenseal is an impressive herb with potent antibiotic properties, similar to echinacea, for alleviating cold symptoms. Goldenseal effectively immobilized microbes, including cold viruses, making it a promising remedy for cold relief. [10]

To further explore the benefits of Goldenseal root and how to use it, this video will provide you with the comprehensive information. Let's take a look:

Other Herbs For Bladder Infection You Should Know

Urtica dioica (Urticaceae) is another renowned herbal medicine containing phytosterols, triterpenic acids, lignans, polysaccharides, and simple phenolic compounds. It is utilized in the treatment of urinary difficulties associated with menopause. [11]

Ammi visnaga (Apiaceae) has a traditional application in alleviating pain associated with renal colic and addressing spastic urinary tract disorders. [11]

Horseradish (Cochlearia armoracia) possesses volatile oil that has been demonstrated to have bactericidal properties, effectively eliminating bacteria that can be responsible for urinary tract infections. [12]

Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) is traditionally used to treat and prevent urinary tract infections. Like cranberries, blueberries have bioactive compounds that prevent E. coli from sticking to the bladder walls. This makes blueberries a potentially beneficial natural remedy for urinary tract health. [12]

FAQs

Is It Safe To Use Goldenseal Root For UTIs?

Goldenseal is generally safe when taken at recommended dosages in the short term. Side effects are rare, but some individuals may experience mild symptoms like nausea or irritability. [13]

What Are The Alternatives To Goldenseal Root For UTIs?

Alternatives to Goldenseal Root for Utis are Barberry, Celery Seed, Cranberry, Echinacea, Goldenrod, Horsetail, Saw Palmetto,... these are all medicinal herbs that help protect you from urinary tract infections.

How Long Does It Take For Goldenseal Root To Work For UTIs?

Not many studies prove the effectiveness of goldenseal root in treating UTIs. However, regularly using this herb in appropriate doses will bring good results to the body. [13]

Conclusion

Goldenseal root is rich in Berberine, a potent compound known for its antibacterial properties that can aid in preventing urinary tract infections. Therefore, considering this option would be wise if you're seeking an herbal remedy for UTIs.

References

[1] Chee Wei Tan, & Maciej Piotr Chlebicki. (2016). Urinary tract infections in adults. Singapore Medical Journal, 57(09), 485–490. https://doi.org/10.11622/smedj.2016153
[2] Sedigheh, B., Sareh Darvishi Fork, Ahmadi, R., & Bahman Khameneh. (2021). Deep insights into urinary tract infections and effective natural remedies. African Journal of Urology, 27(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12301-020-00111-z
[3] Saeed, S. (2010). HERBAL REMEDIES FOR URINARY TRACT INFECTION. INT. J. BIOL. BIOTECH, 7(4), 347–352. https://ijbbku.com/assets/custom/journals/2010/4/HERBAL%20REMEDIES%20FOR%20URINARY%20TRACT%20INFECTION.pdf
[4] Weber, H. A., Zart, M. K., Hodges, A. E., H Michael Molloy, O’Brien, B. M., Moody, L. A., Clark, A. P., Harris, R. K., J Diane Overstreet, & Smith, C. S. (2003). Chemical Comparison of Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) Root Powder from Three Commercial Suppliers. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(25), 7352–7358. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf034339r
[5] Sun, D., Abraham, S. N., & Beachey, E. H. (1988). Influence of berberine sulfate on synthesis and expression of Pap fimbrial adhesin in uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 32(8), 1274–1277. https://doi.org/10.1128/aac.32.8.1274
[6] Bag, A., Bhattacharyya, S., & Chattopadhyay, R. (2008). Pharmacognosy Reviews [Phcog Rev, 2. https://www.phcogrev.com/sites/default/files/PhcogRev-2-4-277.pdf
[7] Working, I. (2016). Exposure Data. Nih.gov; International Agency for Research on Cancer. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK350390/
[8] Rehman, J., Dillow, J. M., Carter, S. M., Chou, J., Le, B., & Maisel, A. S. (1999). Increased production of antigen-specific immunoglobulins G and M following in vivo treatment with the medicinal plants Echinacea angustifolia and Hydrastis canadensis. Immunology Letters, 68(2-3), 391–395. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0165-2478(99)00085-1
[9] Sudip Kumar Mandal, Amal Kumar Maji, Siddhartha Kumar Mishra, Pir Mohammad Ishfaq, Hari Prasad Devkota, Ana Sanches Silva, & Das, N. (2020). Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) and its active constituents: A critical review of their efficacy and toxicological issues. Pharmacological Research, 160, 105085–105085. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2020.105085
[10] Parkman, C. A. (2001). Complementary and alternative therapies for the common cold. The Case Manager, 12(1), 28–30. https://doi.org/10.1067/mcm.2001.112776
[11] Gohari, A.-R., & Saeidnia, S. (2014). The role of herbal medicines in treatment of urinary tract diseases. Journal of Nephropharmacology, 3(1), 13–14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5297587/
[12] Bag, A., Bhattacharyya, S., & Chattopadhyay, R. (2008). Pharmacognosy Reviews [Phcog Rev, 2. https://www.phcogrev.com/sites/default/files/PhcogRev-2-4-277.pdf
[13] Gurley, B. J., Swain, A., Barone, G. W., D. Keith Williams, Breen, P., C. Ryan Yates, Stuart, L. B., Hubbard, M. A., Tong, Y., & Sreekhar Cheboyina. (2006). Effect of Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and Kava Kava (Piper methysticum) Supplementation on Digoxin Pharmacokinetics in Humans. Drug Metabolism and Disposition, 35(2), 240–245. https://doi.org/10.1124/dmd.106.012708
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Author

Ralph S. Albert, with over 10 years of expertise in nutrition and research, now heads the Research division at Vinatura Supplements. His dedication and extensive knowledge ensure top-quality articles on nutrition and health, collaborating with a skilled team. He has successfully completed The VINATURA Expertise Research Training Program, underscoring his commitment to Vinatura's mission. Ralph has also published numerous articles and conducted valuable research in the field, making him a trusted resource for individuals on their wellness journey.

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